Be a Hero for Kids with Cancer

New Year, New You? Does one of your New Year’s resolutions include fitness, taking on a new challenge, helping others, or volunteering?

This year, why not get involved, enjoy a challenge, while also becoming a hero for children with cancer all around the world? Whether you enjoying running, cheering, baking or biking, there is an event for everyone! You can participate in an event to support World Child Cancer anywhere around the globe.

Visit our website to learn more or email info@worldchildcancer.us. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook for the latest.

Paul Barach Runs the Seattle Marathon 12/1/13 for World Child Cancer

Paul Barach Runs the Seattle Marathon 12/1/13 for World Child Cancer

We Need Your Help: Global Giving Winter Challenge

We’ve got some exciting news to share: World Child Cancer USA has a unique opportunity through the international fundraising site, GlobalGiving.org, to raise funds for World Child Cancer’s project in Ghana. We applied and got approved for a trial campaign from November 25th to December 31st. During this period, we need to raise at least $5,000 from 40 different donors.

With your help, we can reach our fundraising goal and become a permanent fixture on the site. This means we can use their online platform to gain a global presence and matching donations to help more kids with cancer at our projects. A little goes a long way in Ghana, where a full course of chemotherapy drugs for Burkitt Lymphoma costs $75.

About Our Project in Ghana

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World Child Cancer is helping children in Ghana by improving cancer diagnosis, treatment and supportive care at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital in Accra. World Child Cancer transfers this expertise through medical twinning partnerships. The partnership creates a two-way transfer of skills and knowledge to develop locally appropriate, affordable, and sustainable solutions to the problem of child cancer in Ghana. The project helps over 150 children a year by saving lives and reducing suffering.

How You Can Help 

Please join us in supporting our work in Ghana and donate to our project page here between November 25th to December 31st. Also, please repost and share our project page on social media.

Thank you so much for your support! For more information on our project in Ghana, please visit our website.

Global giving

Jo’s Visit to the Philippines: Day 1

Jo Hopkins is visiting World Child Cancer’s project in the Philippines this week. She is visiting the island of Mindanao where the project leader, Doc Mae, has established a 5 centre satellite network to improve diagnosis and access to treatment. Currently only 20% of all suspected childhood cancer cases are diagnosed on the island.

Doc Mae and her patients

Today Jo visited the Southern Philippines Medical Centre in Davao where she met Gemma, a 14 year old osteosarcoma patient. She also met Belleber, a leukaemia patient, at the House of Hope home away from home for patients. Gemma and Belleber’s chance of survival has improved since World Child Cancer started working in Mindanao 4 years ago.

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Doc Mae, Jo Hopkins, and 14 year old patient, Gemma at the Southern Philippines Medical Centre in Davao

Tomorrow Jo will be attending a symposium on retinoblastoma in Cagayan de Oro and will be joined by doctors Scott Howard and Catherine Lam (from St Jude Children’s Research Hospital) who are members of World Child Cancer’s Project Committee.

Belleber a Leukemia Patient staying at the House of Hope home

Belleber a Leukemia Patient staying at the House of Hope home

Stay tuned for more updates on Jo’s visit. For more information about World Child Cancer’s projects in the Philippines, please visit our website.

Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month in the US. Did you know that 80% of all new pediatric cancer cases occur outside of the US in lower and middle income countries? Cancer impacts children indiscriminately all over the world. This September, join World Child Cancer USA in raising awareness of childhood cancer in the developing world.

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Here are 5 facts you may not know about childhood cancer: 

1. 100,000 children with cancer are dying unnecessarily in the developing world every year.

2. Many of these children are dying without effective pain relief – they are dying in pain.

3. Survival rates in the US and developed world average at 80%. In the developing world, just 10% of children survive.

4. The expertise and resources needed to resolve this global inequality in access to treatment and care exists. Yet only 20% of the world’s children currently have access to it.

5. Cancer is not prohibitively expensive to treat – just $775 will provide the treatment and care needed to cure a child with cancer in sub-Saharan Africa.

Please remember all kids with cancer this September. The resources and expertise exist to treat kids with cancer in the developing world. To learn more about World Child Cancer’s projects, please visit our website and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Childhood Cancer Awareness 2

5 Myths and Facts about Childhood Cancer

Next month, September, is Childhood Awareness Month in the US. We’d like to share some common myths about childhood cancer in lower and middle income countries:

1. Myth: Childhood cancer is a “first world” problem 

Fact: 80% of new childhood cancer cases each year occur in lower and middle income countries. Lower and middle income countries are disproportionately burdened by cancer. 100,000 children with cancer are dying unnecessarily every year.

LMIC cancer map

2. Myth: Communicable diseases – AIDS, TB, and Malaria – are the biggest health issues in the developing world. 

Fact: Cancer kills more people than TB, HIV/AIDS, and malaria combined in lower and middle income countries.  Every year, 8 million people die from cancer and this number is expected rise to 13 million in 2030. While cancer accounts for approximately 55% of all deaths, the disease only receives 2% of the funding.

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3. Myth: Cancer is too expensive and difficult to treat in lower and middle income countries (LMICs). 

Fact: Just $775 provides the drugs, treatment, and care for a child with cancer in sub-Saharan Africa. This is on average, 300 times cheaper than the cost of treatment in the US.

Oscar, a Wilm's Tumor patient at World Child Cancer's project in Malawi. His treatment cost approximately $775 and was successful.

Oscar, a Wilm’s Tumor patient at World Child Cancer’s project in Malawi. His treatment cost approximately $775 and was successful.

4. Myth: Childhood cancer is a death sentence in LMICs. 

Fact: With treatment, 50% – 60% of kids with childhood cancer in the developing would can be saved with generic drugs and relatively simple treatment protocols known to doctors for decades.

"Cancer is real. Cancer can be treated." Patients, families, and medical staff at World Child Cancer's project in Cameroon created t-shirts to raise awareness about childhood cancer.

“Cancer is real. Cancer can be treated.” Patients, families, and medical staff at World Child Cancer’s project in Cameroon created t-shirts to raise awareness about childhood cancer.

5. Myth: Cancer is always a noncommunicable disease (NCD). 

Fact: The line between communicable and non-communicable diseases is blurring. Burkitt’s lymphoma, the most common childhood cancer in central Africa, is linked to a virus and Malaria may also contribute to the disease. In North America1 in 25 cancers are associated with infectious agents, but in LMICs it’s 1 in 4.

Thank you for reading! To learn more about World Child Cancer’s twining model and projects, visit our website, like us on Facebook, and follow us on Twitter.